Stanford Reward Circuits of the Brain (RBRAIN)

Overview

Ketamine, MDMA (“ecstasy”) and methamphetamine are drugs of abuse that have steadily gained in popularity. Compared to more traditional stimulants or narcotics, however, less is known about their mode of action, their subjective effects, and how these effects promote continued use. By integrating four Research Projects led by Drs. Karl Deisseroth, Lisa Giocomo, Robert Malenka, Leanne Williams, and Brian Knutson, we aim to develop a theoretically-informed characterization of the effects of these drugs on the neurobehavior of specific circuits for processing risk and reward, the connectivity of these circuits, and how these circuits and their connectivity predict acute drug experience and drug use outcomes.
​​

Our Methods

We use a variety of techniques to measure brain activity.
​​

RBRAIN Research Team
  1. Phillips@mail.com
    Leanne Williams, PhD
    Principal Investigator
  2. Phillips@mail.com
    Christina B. Young, PhD
    Postdoctoral Fellow
  3. Phillips@mail.com
    Laura Hack, MD, PhD
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Description
  4. Phillips@mail.com
    Jake Hartley, BS
    Clinical Research Coordinator II
    Description
  5. Phillips@mail.com
    Bailey Holt-Gosselin, BS
    Neuroimaging Research Coordinator
    Description
  6. Phillips@mail.com
    Megan Chesnut, MS
    Neuroimaging Research Coordinator
    Description
  7. Phillips@mail.com
    Lauren Whicker, BA
    Neuroimaging Research Coordinator
    Description
Collaborators
  1. Phillips@mail.com
    Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD
  2. Phillips@mail.com
    Brian Knutson, PhD
    Description
  3. Phillips@mail.com
    Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD
    Description
  4. Phillips@mail.com
    Lisa Giocomo, PhD
    Description
  5. Phillips@mail.com
    Robert Malenka, MD, PhD
    Description
  6. Phillips@mail.com
    Patricia Suppes, MD, PhD
    Description
  7. Phillips@mail.com
    Boris Heifets, MD, PhD
    Description
Funding

​RBRAIN is funded through a National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) Specialized Center (P50) grant.

Grant: P50DA042012